Club Information

Contents

Our home ground
Club officers
Net practice details
Subscriptions and match fees
A guide to tea-making
The Leagues we play in
Club honours
Player of the year
Annual Reports
AGM Minutes

Home Ground

Cryfield Sports Pitches,
Warwick University,
Gibbet Hill Road,
Coventry,
CV4 7AL,

Pavilion Phone Number:
02476 572467

For further information on, directions to, and more pictures of our home ground see the grounds page.



Staff vs Evenley at Cryfield, Roadside ground, July 2002

Club Officers and email addresses

Chairman: Lincoln Allison
League secretary : Chris Cooper
Fixture Secretary: Hari Singh
Membership Secretary: Daniyal Sherazi
Treasurer: Andy Davidson
Grounds Liaison: Steve Lamb
Club Archivist: Alan Lovell
Saturday 1st XI Captain: Ankur Chandra
Saturday 1st XI Vice-Captain: Daniyal Sherazi
Sunday Captain: Rotation basis
Wednesday Captain: Daniyal Sherazi
Midweek Social 'Casuals' Captain: Lincoln Allison
Website: Rob Wood

Net practice

Nets take place every Friday evening, from the New Year, through the season, until September. They are held in the Desso sports hall on campus, on Friday evenings from 5.30pm to 7.30pm. Once again new players of any ability are most welcome!

Due to difficulties in booking sessions please check the home page for any deviations to the above.

Annual subscriptions and match fees

For full details on how to join WUSCC, click here.

Match Fees: At weekends usually just the cost of tea, which is generally between £3.00 and £3.50, though if league umpires are present an extra £2 is likely to be charged to cover their costs. Midweek league matches have a match fee of £1.50 (to cover umpires' fees and minor administration costs), and midweek evening friendlies are generally free.

League membership

South Northants League (Saturdays) - in 2015 the 1st XI will play in the Premier Division.
Coventry and District Cricket League - we are associate members who have competed in the over-21 midweek 20-overs league since 1978.

A Guide to Tea-making

"The old philosopher is still with us in … the shirt which ought to be at wash, blinking, puffing, rolling his head, drumming with his fingers, tearing his meat like a tiger, and swallowing his tea in oceans." So runs Macaulay's final reminiscence of Johnson.

Old Staff cricketers sometimes enjoy the confidence of their colleagues, and sometimes not; but always they have opinions, and rationalisations for their actions at the ready. In short, they too are philosophers. The tea is the key here. Staff cricketers have clean shirts, do not blink, seldom puff, and eat meat with delicacy if at all. But tea they do drink; not sipping, but swallowing.

Amongst the subjects that attract the opinion of cricketers is the cricket tea. First, that there shall be one, and second that it shall be of satisfying quality. It is in the interest of the consumers that preparation shall have been detailed and luxurious, but it is in the contrary interest of the tea-maker to spend as little time and trouble as possible. Luckily the tea-maker's minimalist tendency is tempered by a common interest with the consumers, since all Staff cricketers provide the tea in turn. Few indeed get any help from their partners in this enterprise, and many would not have the courage even to raise the subject. An inadequate tea brings opprobrium only onto the tea-maker.

Fluid intake is critical, especially on hot days. Some alfresco teas offer orange squash in place of tea, but old stagers continue to prefer tea even if the taste of the drink gives little clue to its identity. "Look here, steward, if this is coffee, I want tea: but if this is tea, I wish for coffee", said a Punch cartoon of a hundred years ago. Whatever it is, there should be a lot of it.

Where should the tea be taken? The sheer distance between Cryfield pitches and pavilion, especially the Lakeside pitch, dictates that the tea interval cannot be shorter than 45 minutes and can easily extend to an hour if the tea is, as usual, set out upstairs in the pavilion. Only here is it practical to serve tea rather than orange squash with the meal. So there is the choice: get on with the game but drink cold squash beside the pitch, or meander stiffly up to the pavilion and back again to enjoy a full tea but risk finishing the game in the twilight. Captains vary in their opinions and in their willingness to accept the tea-maker's preference. They "…sometimes counsel take, and sometimes tea", to bowdlerise Pope.

The pavilion staff will open the barred gate for a car loaded with the tea, if it is to be taken beside the pitch. This is a hard-won concession that needs to be used from time to time just to maintain it, rather as a landowner shuts certain paths one day a year to prevent the establishment of a right of way. Would that the Warwick Waffen security would adopt a liberal attitude rather than the universal prohibition otherwise practised.

Some teas really are taken down to the mini-pavilions by more adventurous providers, but most of the time the tea is taken in the main pavilion. There is a good kitchen with all the facilities needed. A good urn and teapot were donated some years ago by one of the older players but these have since been commandeered by Coventry City F.C., who claim to have supplied them themselves. This is yet another example of the careless behaviour of those involved in an industry that exists in a complete moral vacuum. Various milk jugs, spoons and so forth remain from the original donation but are not used. No matter; there is plenty of equipment there.

Pavilion staff will often help with the business of making the tea. This can go well beyond the call of duty and is a greatly welcomed service, for which the Club is truly thankful. If, as is usually the case, the tea-maker is playing in the match it is very useful to have the urn switched on and some of the mess cleared up afterwards. The duty ground staff stays on until the end of every game and assistance with the whole business of putting on cricket matches is truly valuable.

Even amongst Staff cricketers most people know how to make tea. The urn takes less than half-an-hour to boil three gallons of water, and the teapot takes 15-20 teabags according to taste. Milk and sugar are supplied by the tea-maker; two pints of milk is always enough. A quantity of half-pint white mugs is available - Churchill 10oz. Standard white mugs, for anyone wishing to reorder.

There is a wide divergence of views about what food should be on offer. It is up to the tea-maker to provide what he can within a reasonable cost, which has risen over the years to around £2.50 and lies always between £2 and £3. The tea-maker should not, please, aim to make a profit for himself.

Several classes of tea have emerged:

  • the Utility Tea: just tea and biscuits. Employed to save time. More recently this term has also been used to describe a tea consisting of ready-to-eat supermarket-sourced sandwiches and cakes. When used in the latter way it is not entirely derogatory; the rise of the pre-packed sandwich has certainly caused a levelling out in the standards of tea-making.
  • the Economy Tea: a visit to supermarket of choice as late as possible before the game, to buy reduced price sandwiches and other bargain offers. Risks absence of bargains.
  • the Thatcherite Economy Tea: as above but charged at full price. Unpopular but favoured by some indigent younger members.
  • the Heritage Tea: reissue of tea from previous cancelled game, fresh from the freezer.
  • the Widow's Blessing: prepared by the player’s partner rather than the player himself. Extremely rare at this club, though apparently more common elsewhere. Often intricate, generally delicious and attracts envious glances from less-fortunate team-mates.
  • the Idler: a tea produced and delivered by an outside catering firm, requiring no input from the player concerned other than signing a cheque.
  • the Traditional (Constance Spry): home-made sandwiches, savoury finger food and fresh cakes. Widely favoured.
  • the Eastern Promise: traditional tea with addition of curried finger food. Favoured by tea-makers with a Birmingham connection.
  • the Mrs. Beeton: individual salads followed by sandwiches and cakes. A rare treat.
  • the Waitress Service: still awaited mythical tea reported to be provided by some SNCL clubs.

It is up to the tea-maker to choose his style. He has complete freedom in this, in the certain knowledge that other people's styles are different and so his will attract comment.

It is universally believed that sandwiches are an essential element of the cricket tea, but there is a big difference between a satisfying sandwich and a pawky sandwich. The fillings should be damp. Nothing is more disappointing to the thirsty mouth than to bite on a sandwich filled only with grated cheese, especially when the tea is too hot to gulp. Egg sandwiches with plenty of mayonnaise are excellent, and most things with salad to provide lubrication find ready acceptance. Sandwiches should be generously filled even if it means that there are fewer of them.

Cakes too should not be dry. Cakes almost always go well but those with a filling are the most relished. Quiches are naturally full of liquid and easy to eat but the pastry is too often left on the side of the plate.

It is surprising how many cricketers appear to get much of their daily calorific requirement from their tea. A reasonable calculation of the food required turns out to leave people looking around for more. It is a good plan to cater generously for 25 people. Three well-filled loaves of sandwiches will vanish like a veteran's googly.

There are often vegetarians to cater for and this can only reasonably be done by ensuring that not all the sandwiches have meat fillings, and so on. Vegetarians can then tear their salad like rabbits. The tigerish Johnson would not have approved, but then his thoughts on the whole game of cricket would surely have been shot through with irony. His dictionary definition might have been "A game played by wastrels with time on their hands and the ball on the ground", and his opinion about the cricket tea "Superfluous refreshment supposed to sustain the cricketer but truly intended to ensure that his game is concluded only when hostelry doors are open".

Johnson would only have been half right.
Nick Boucher

Honours

South Northamptonshire Cricket League:
members from 2002-
(In 2002 and 2003 we fielded a single XI, from
2004- we fielded 2 XI's)
1st XI
Division 4 Champions 2002
Division 1 Runners-up 2005
Division 2 Runners-up 2003

Premier Division KO Cup Winners 2013
Wardington Cup 2011
Premier Division KO Cup Winners 2007
Division 1 KO Cup Winners 2004
Division 2 KO Cup Winners 2003

2nd XI (AKA 'The Killer B's')
Division 3 Champions 2007
Division 4 Runners-up 2004




Willoughby Inter-club League Salver:
members from 1995-2001
Winners 1999
Runners-up 1997



Coventry and District Midweek 20-over League:
members from 1978-
Winners 1985, 1988
Runners-up 1978, 1994, 1995

Player of the Year

1987 Ken Foster
1988 Nick Boucher and Alan Tunnicliffe
1989 Steve Lamb
1990 Rob Burns
1991 James Daniel
1992 Robert Pettifer
1993 Steve Curram
1994 Rob Burns
1995 Steve Curram
1996 Steve Lamb
1997 Richard Dobedoe
1998 Alan Marchant
1999 Steve Lamb
2000 Richard Dobedoe
2001 Chris Stride
2002 Neil Carter
2003 Rob Wood
2004 Nick Boucher
2005 Steve Lamb
2006 Christopher Lamb
2007 Sandeep Sandhu
2008 Ajit Nair
2009 Mike Allison & Nicky Sandhu
2010 Ajit Nair
2011 Ajay & Ajit Nair
2012 Hari Singh
2013 Siddarth K.S.
2014 Sourabh Bajaj
2015 Ankur Chandra

Annual Reports

Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2016.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2016.
Click here for the Sunday Captain's report, 2016.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2015.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2015.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2014.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2014.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2013.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2013.
Click here for the Sunday Captain's report, 2013.
Click here for the Wednesday XI Captain's report, 2012.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2012.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2012.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2012.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2011.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2010.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2010.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2009.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2008.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2008.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2007.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2007.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2006.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2006.
Click here for the Wednesday Captain's report, 2006.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2005.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2005.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2004.
Click here for the Saturday 1st XI Captain's report, 2004.
Click here for the Saturday 2nd XI Captain's report, 2004.
Click here for a report back from the Wednesday League AGM, 2004.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2003.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2002.
Click here for the Chairman's annual report, 2001.

AGM Minutes

Click here for the minutes of the 2010 Club AGM.
Click here for the minutes of the 2009 Club AGM.
Click here for the minutes of the 2008 Club AGM.
Click here for the minutes of the 2007 Club AGM.
Click here for the minutes of the 2006 Club AGM.
Click here for the minutes of the 2005 Club AGM.
Click here for the minutes of the 2004 Club AGM.
Click here for the minutes of the 2003 Club AGM.
Click here for the minutes of the 2002 Club AGM.
Click here for the minutes of the 2001 Club AGM.
Click here for the minutes of the 2000 Club AGM.
Click here for the minutes of the 1999 Club AGM.

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